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A discrete gun safe

December 10, 2012

By Tom Menner
(GunNews) – You know how Subway sandwich shops stamp your lunch club card every time you buy a sandwich?  When you card is full you get a free sandwich.  What I need is a gun dealer who stamps my club card with every gun purchase then gives me a free gun safe with every 12th gun.  If I could find that dealer, my problem would be solved.

Until then, for those of us who don’t have $1600 or even a thousand to spend on a really secure gun safe (or a second one) to hold a(nother) dozen to two dozen firearms, here’s a unorthodox solution to consider.

It is a $249 ‘tool box’ from the local Lowe’s store.  It is all-steel, welded construction and sports two difficult-to-tamper with  locks.  You buy two quality padlocks and install them in brackets provided. The shackle holds the lid in place.  When you look closely at the box, it is a well-constructed item and will make a great home for a dozen or two of your favorite toys, and even have room for a few thousand rounds of ammunition too!  The ammo helps to ensure the box can’t “grow legs.”

Speaking of burglars, how many are going to suspect a tool box as holding lots of guns?   A gun safe screams “GUNS!” but this box is quite unobtrusive and nosy neighbors and visitors (both welcome and not so) will have no idea guns are present.  If you have an old tool box like this, all the better.  “Oh, so he’s got some junk in that old tool box.”

To convert the box to gun safe I added the wooden rack.  You could use polished walnut but I went with plain pine.  The rack holds 24″ of guns side by side on one level (or two, it’s your choice).   The added height of scoped rifles is not a problem.  Another rack can be added to one end with wood dowels drilled in to a pine base for pistol hangers if you wish.

Some other options include bolting it into the basement or garage floor to keep it home if you don’t keep ammo in the bottom.  Another option is to wire it with a small 4 watt nightlight.  This small bulb put out light to find things in the safe, and more importantly it will put out a small amount of heat to drive away moisture.

While not as beautiful, or fireproof as a $1200 Browning safe, it is a far more covert way to store firearms quite securely against nosy eyes and / or sticky fingers.

 

 

 

Text Box: Hidden in plain sight<br /><br />Tool box gun safe<br /><br />By Tom Menner

You know how Subway sandwich shops stamp your lunch club card every time you buy a sandwich?  When you card is full you get a free sandwich.  What I need is a gun dealer who stamps my club card with every gun purchase then gives me a free gun safe with every 12th gun.  If I could find that dealer, my problem would be solved. 

Until then, for those of us who don’t have $1600 or even a thousand to spend on a really secure gun safe (or a second one) to hold a(nother) dozen to two dozen firearms, here’s a unorthodox solution to consider.

Text Box:  A couple thousand rounds (or more, gasp!) of ammo keeps even an Arnold Schwartzenegger / Hulk Hogan duo from waltzing away your tool box. Text Box:  It is a $249 ‘tool box’ from the local Lowe’s store.  It is all-steel, welded construction and sports two difficult-to-tamper with  locks.  You buy two quality padlocks and install them in brackets provided. The shackle holds the lid in place.  When you look closely at the box, it is a well-constructed item and will make a great home for a dozen or two of your favorite toys, and even have room for a few thousand rounds of ammunition too!  The ammo helps to ensure the box can’t “grow legs.”

Speaking of burglars, how many are going to suspect a tool box as holding lots of guns?   A gun safe screams “GUNS!” but this box is quite unobtrusive and nosy neighbors and visitors (both welcome and not so) will have no idea guns are present.  If you have an old tool box like this, all the better.  “Oh, so he’s got some junk in that old tool box.”

To convert the box to gun safe I added the wooden rack.  You could use polished walnut but I went with plain pine.  The rack holds 24” of guns side by side on one level (or two, it’s your choice).   The added height of scoped rifles is not a problem.  Another rack can be added to one end with wood dowels drilled in to a pine base for pistol hangers if you wish. 

Some other options include bolting it into the basement or garage floor to keep it home if you don’t keep ammo in the bottom.  Another option is to wire it with a small 4 watt nightlight.  This small bulb put out light to find things in the safe, and more importantly it will put out a small amount of heat to drive away moisture.

While not as beautiful, or fireproof as a $1200 Browning safe, it is a far more covert way to store firearms quite securely against nosy eyes and / or sticky fingers.

 

 


By Dave Kopel & Timothy Wheeler

National Review Online

Testosterone is in again. Witness the ascent of Dr. Richard Carmona, the true-to-life hero nominated by President Bush for the post of surgeon general and recently confirmed, unanimously, by the Senate. Our new surgeon general displays the manly virtue of courage that our nation has again learned to admire since we went to war. The confirmation process reflects our rediscovered consensus that real men aren’t afraid to use force — even deadly force — when necessary to protect a woman from a violent predator.

Text Box: A good man<br /><br /> The new Surgeon General of the United States knows how to handle a gun.  The former Green Beret has been frequently criticized and his actions second-guessed by those who eschew firearms and firearm rights.<br /><br />Carmona’s life story is one of overcoming adversity and excelling in service to others. A high-school dropout from Harlem, he joined the Army and won two Purple Hearts, serving as a medic and a Green Beret. After distinguishing himself as a soldier he resumed his education, becoming a trauma surgeon and earning a postgraduate degree in health policy and administration. Carmona also directed the first trauma care program in southern Arizona.

 

Along the way, the surgeon-soldier-administrator became an expert on bioterrorism and an advocate for bioterrorism preparedness several years before September 11. So far, shining credentials for a surgeon general.

 

But Carmona’s other high-profile accomplishments stirred a controversy that highlights Americans’ ambiguity about the use of force. In 1999 Carmona, a sheriff’s deputy and SWAT-team member, encountered a man assaulting a woman. As the Los Angles Times later explained, Carmona had “stumbled onto a killer who was holding a woman hostage. The man, who police later determined had stabbed his father to death and was on his way to kill an old girlfriend, grazed Carmona’s head with a bullet before the doctor, also a badge-carrying sheriff’s deputy, fired a single shot to kill him.”

 

Carmona had done his job as a sworn peace officer and saved the life of an innocent woman, as well as his own.

 

But University of Arizona colleague Dr. Charles Putnam denounced Carmona for allegedly violating the physician’s duty to do no harm. But in fact, the “do no harm” phrase is a simplification of language from the Hippocratic Oath:

 

I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked.

 

This language is, by its terms, confined to the physician’s role in treating his patients — not in his role as a father defending a home from a violent invader, or a peace officer defending his community from a murderer.

 

When the Hippocratic Oath is meant to apply to a physician’s non-professional life, the oath specifically says so, for a physician is bound to keep secret he learns “in connection with my professional practice or not in connection with it.”

 

Text Box: Real men aren’t afraid to use force in defense of innocent life<br /><br />A real-life hero Surgeon General<br /><br />In modern times, most medical ethicists have not delved into issues involving homicidal attacks on medical personnel. Three authors who have, however, are Harvard psychiatry professor Arthur Z. Berg, University of Illinois at Chicago psychiatry and public health professor Carl C. Bell, U-Cal. Davis psychiatry professor Joe Tupin. In their article “Aspects of Violence: Issues in Prevention and Treatment” (published in vol. 86 of the journal New Directions for Mental Health Services, Summer 2000). Advising mental-health workers on dealing with violent patients, Berg and his co-authors explain:

 

The idea of harming someone is foreign to most mental health workers. Nonviolent methods that do not cause harm are appropriate for management of aggressive patients. But when faced with serious bodily injury or death, those methods may not apply. The clinician must be prepared to do whatever violence is necessary to save himself or herself and other. In these situations, “First do no harm” has no place.

 

Nevertheless, the verbal attack on Carmona escalated when Dr. James Curran, the Dean of the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University weighed in. Because of Emory’s proximity to the federal Centers for Disease Control, also located Atlanta, its school of public health tends to get a good deal of media attention.

 

Dean Curran announced that he was not “proud that our surgeon general shoots people.” He denounced Carmona as “a cowboy.”

 

Consistent with Dean Curran’s aversion to Carmona’s use of a firearm, Emory University has long served as a center of antigun propaganda, most notably from Dr. Arthur Kellermann, a tireless producer of dubious antigun factoids. More recently, Emory has become infamous as the home of history professor Michael Bellesiles, author of the now-exposed hoax book Arming America.

 

Because Dr. Carmona was carrying a gun and knew how to use it, a violent criminal died, and  two or more innocent women and men survived. By the moral calculus of most people, this would seem a very good result. Had Dr. Carmona “done no harm” to the harmful predator, then the innocent hostage would have been assaulted and perhaps murdered. The killer might have gone to murder his ex-girlfriend, as well as any peace officers (Carmona included) who attempted to interfere. To be explicit: A dead male violent predator is a better public-health result than several innocent women and men brutalized, severely injured, and possibly murdered.

 

As Dean Curran’s denunciation of the life-saving Dr. Carmona highlights, “public health” is, in some hands, increasingly becoming an instrument of moral intolerance, rather than of genuine public health.

This is why the “public-health” campaign against guns and gun owners tends to ignore or disparage lawful defensive uses of firearms against criminals, or against genocidal governments — even though genocide is surely the worst possible “health outcome.”

 

Rather notably, many of the prime targets of today’s “public-health” puritans are same targets which have always been so bothersome to people who insist that everyone live by a single standard of moral purity: tobacco, alcohol, and food. But rather than make the straightforward (and not implausible) moral arguments against smoking, drinking, and gluttony, the “public health” puritans wrap their claims in spurious factoids created by bogus research.

 

They campaign for smoking prohibition on the ludicrous grounds that inhaling secondhand smoke is more dangerous than smoking cigarettes. They campaign against alcohol by raising scare statistics about “binge drinking” — and rather significantly, their “binge drinkers” include people who drink at levels which leave them stone cold sober. Likewise, the “public-health” puritans rail against gluttony — by producing bogus statistics about “obesity” which define NFL running-backs as “obese.”

 

Of course there are many serious, dedicated public-health workers and scholars who really do protect public health. The genuine health professionals are busy fighting against infectious diseases, monitoring the safety of drinking water, and studying how viruses spread from one population to another.

 

Yet too often, the “public-health” voices which appear in the newspapers aren’t the voices of health advocacy, but the voices of neo-puritanism, masked in public-health rhetoric and waving phony and frightening statistics.

 

In a sense, Dean Curran’s attack on Dr. Carmona serves the useful of purpose of revealing how extreme the Puritans of Public Health Agenda can be. It’s not really about reducing how often innocents are harmed by guns; the agenda won’t even allow rampaging murderers to be harmed with guns.

 

Our United States Senate, happily, found nothing immoral in Dr. Carmona’s record. Had Dr. Carmona ever performed an abortion, or if he had ever volunteered at a pro-life medical counseling center, you can be sure that at least a few senators would have found the doctor’s actions morally disturbing. But saving women by shooting a rampaging murder — there’s nothing at all morally disturbing about that — at least according to the 98 United States senators who voted for Dr. Carmona. (Two were absent.)

 

Dr. Richard Carmona is a physician and educator with demonstrated ability under fire, both metaphorically and literally. He has stood in that dark place where evil threatens, and he has prevailed. What better person could serve as surgeon general for a nation at war?

 

— Dave Kopel is an NRO contributing editor. Timothy Wheeler is president of Doctors for Responsible Gun Ownership, a project of The Claremont Institute.

 


 

Judge says Chicago police must stop holding witnesses, denying lawyers

Chicago (AP) – A federal judge ruled that Chicago police and prosecutors routinely violate the rights of witnesses by holding them too long and denying them access to lawyers.

 

U.S. District Judge Milton Shadur issued an injunction requiring police to begin allowing lawyers to see witnesses immediately upon their detention. Shadur wrote Monday that the theory that police treat witnesses differently than suspects and let them know they’re free to leave is “totally at odds with actual practice.”

 

“No reasonable person would knowingly volunteer to remain in a small, windowless, locked interrogation room for such extended periods of time,” Shadur wrote in a 41-page opinion.

 

The ruling was in response to a lawsuit by First Defense Legal Aid, a not-for-profit group that said its lawyers were denied access to witnesses who were held for up to 24 hours.

BODY COUNT EXAMPLE:

An example of how an innocent person makes Mayor Daley’s Body Count list.

 

Man held in nurse’s killing

Chicago (Sun-Times) - A judge ordered the ex-boyfriend of a slain South Shore Hospital nurse held without bail in her death. Kelly Margaff, 27, was attacked Aug. 9 in her house in the 1200 block of East 75th Street. She was stabbed 47 times, and her throat was sliced. Laron McGee, 25, of the 7900 block of South Carpenter, who was charged in the attack, had dated Margaff early this year, Assistant Cook County State’s Attorney Kathleen Lanahan said.  She had filed police reports three times accusing McGee of robbery and told co-workers she feared McGee might harm her, Lanahan said.  McGee was on parole at the time of the attack after being convicted in 2000 for delivery of drugs.  He had served time for unlawful use of a weapon and drugs.  He also was convicted of a 1994 misdemeanor gun charge.

Human Sacrifice

MAYOR DALEY’S BODY COUNT:  33

Dead thanks to Mayor Daley’s Gun Control

 

Text Box:  In Memoriam:  Grizel Cardenas, August 11, 2002; Judith Morales-Burgess, August 11, 2002; Kelly Margaff, August 9, 2002;Nelson Arias, August 3, 2002; Barnaby Chan, July 13, 2002; Jairus Williams and Mark Trussell, June 15, 2002; Vickie and Tim Le, June 14, 2002; Ronyale White, May 7, 2002; Errol Edwards, April 28, 2002; Tommy Martin, Jr., April 27, 2002; Alexis Martinez, April 16, 2002; Heriberto Murguia, April 13, 2002; Brenda Worship, April 5, 2002; Name Withheld, Kenneth Cooper and Christopher Green, March 23 2002; Bobby Hall, March 17, 2002; Sandar Mosqueda and Adrian Padilla, March 16, 2002; Julio Roldan, March 14, 2002; Antoinette LaShawn Johnshon, February 25, 2002; Marco Mosely, February 14, 2002; Antonio Willis, February 09, 2002; Riad Al-Dhufari, January 27, 2002; Name Withheld, January 27, 2002; Timothy Lewis, January 26, 2002; Jennifer Klein, January 24, 2002; John C. Ullrich, January 21, 2002; Tina Noel, January 17, 2002; Charles Gordon, January 15, 2002

http://www.concealcarry.org/memorial.htm

 

 

 

 

 

Text Box:<br /><br />

 

 


 

With decisions come consequences… armed and SAFE vs. unarmed and DEAD

UNARMED:  Home invasion  leaves three children knifed to death

Warsaw, Ky. (AP) - A knife-wielding man attacked a mother and her three children in their home Friday, killing two of the children and injuring the woman and the other child, authorities said. A suspect was captured in West Virginia, police said.

The attack happened sometime around 6 a.m., according to state police Sgt. John Bradley.

Police identified the slain children as Cody Sharon, 6, and his sister Chelbi, 7. Their mother, Carolyn Marksberry, was in critical but stable condition at the University of Cincinnati Hospital. Ten-year-old Courtney Sharon was in fair condition at Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital.

Marco Chapman, 30, was taken into custody early Friday afternoon in Shrewsbury, W.Va., and charged with murder, first-degree assault and burglary.

ARMED: Home invasion thwarted – residents safe

Duncan, NC (Record) – A would-be robber is dead and his two accomplices are in jail today after they tried to rob a man in his Duncan home Wednesday night, the Harnett County Sheriff’s Office said. 

According to Maj. Steve West, Terry Alston was in his home on N.C. 42 in the Duncan community when two men appeared at his front door asking to use the telephone at about 10:30 last night. Mr. Alston handed them a cordless phone while they were standing outside the front door, the report said.

When Mr. Alston opened the door and asked the two men if they were done using the phone, he said one of the men pulled out a handgun and said, “You know what time it is,” according to the report.  When the second suspect tried to push open the front door, Mr. Alston said he opened fire on the two men.  Mr. Alston then called the sheriff’s department.

Sgt. T. Parker arrived at the Alston home and found 31-year-old Roger Atterick McRae lying dead at the end of the front door walkway with a gun lying next to him.

Mr. Alston, his two children, and wife were not hurt.

Text Box: “I support gun control, but the Brady Bill is only a start.  There are too many guns out there.”  </p><br /><p>-- Dannel McCollum, IL Senate Candidate, 52nd District.<br /><br />From the Daily Illini, January 21, 1993<br /><br />

0 comments on “A discrete gun safe

  1. jmsiowa on said:

    Looks good, now just bolt it to the ground so it can’t be fork lifted away.

    • Most casual burglars don’t carry a mule or forklift in their back pocket.

      And storing a few thousand rounds of 7.62×51 or 5.56×45 or similar will generally slow down a couple of scrawny kids.

      But yes, tools are a hot commodity. Nothing is perfect, but storing them in one of these boxes surely beats sticking them in a closet somewhere.

      John

  2. Huck Finn on said:

    Great idea! This box or one like it can be a way to potentially hide guns in the open rather than in a fake gun safe or in a very costly safe that screams guns. However, locking it might cue in a thief that something of value is in it. I only own a small number of guns yet I want to keep them secure and reduce my potential liability should they be stolen and used illegally. I am going to look for a smaller unit to fit my needs. I will probably line the floor of the unit with a mix of heavy workout weights and ammo so moving it will be difficult. I no more want a safe that advertises it is for guns or a safe itself than I carry gun bags that say guns on the outside. Would you carry a money bag that says money on it? Ghosting is good.

    • Huck Finn on said:

      BTW, be careful of using a regular easy to lift and walk away with tool box to hide your guns in since tools, especially power tools, are hot items for a thief to steal since they can be re-sold easily.

  3. Boba Fett on said:

    John,
    What kind of pad locks did you use and how do they actually work in locking the box. I looked at one of these at Rural King and couldn’t see how the padlock would hook around the inside latch.

  4. I picked up one of these at Menards for just under $200. It looked to be a bit heavier than the Lowe’s version. Check it carefully at the store though… on mine, one of the locking tabs was misaligned enough to keep a thick hasp padlock from passing through the hole. Easily fixed with a drill, though, and quicker than taking it back to the store.

    I also bought the higher security Master locks at Lowe’s. Menards didn’t have the higher security rated master brand padlocks.

    This is a good solution. Thanks for the suggestion.