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Firearms, Ammunition: Better than fiat cash to store wealth

October 9, 2012

Concerned about the Obama administration’s reckless spending proclivities or the Fed’s monetizing debt rendering your greenbacks’ value deflated?

There are alternatives.

Firearms and ammunition have long been recognized as a viable store of wealth as they will seldom go down in value if maintained.

Here’s an article for your edification on this very subject!

 

Four alternative stores of value

Four alternative stores of value

Simon Black on October 9, 2012
Santiago, Chile

One of the most successful con jobs in the history of the world has been the concept of unbacked paper currency… or fiat money.

Over the last 100-years or so, governments have been able to convince people that their pieces of paper, backed by nothing but promises, actually have ‘value’. This seems truly bizarre when you think about it. Governments tend to be untrusted, serial failures. Yet people readily accept their guarantees the world over.

The history of fiat money has proven to be an almost uninterrupted period of inflation, asset bubbles, booms, busts, bailouts, panics,and other crises… and thankfully, it is an experiment which seems to be quickly nearing its end.

 

The article goes on to explain how there have long been alternative stores of wealth, then goes on to give four recommendations for folks to diversify their holdings.

First up:

1) Ammunition and Firearms may be the new whiskey, especially in North America. FBI firearm checks have been going through the roof in the US over the last few years, and each one of these represents another buyer of weapons and ammo.

Consequently, both have handily withstood the effects of inflation. According to ammo.net, for example, the price of Remington .223 rounds rose 224% from 1999 through 2011.

 

Top photo courtesy Oleg Volk.

Second photo courtesy sovereignman.com.