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The Racist Roots of Gun Control

September 12, 2012

Gun control in America, and in many other nations as well, has long had a racist component to it. Keeping “undesirables” from owning, possessing and using firearms has long been the goal of gun control proponents both then and now.

Some don’t even bother with “dog whistle” comments exposing their bigotry.

Recently, the Violence Policy Center released a study that said, “Successful efforts to reduce America’s black homicide toll must put a focus on reducing access to firearms.”

Racists and bigots of all stripes support gun control.

Here’s a great piece on some of the racist anti-gun laws here in America, for your edification.

 

Laws Designed to Disarm Slaves, Freedmen, and African-Americans

From Old-Yankee.com

Overview

Before the Civil War ended, State “Slave Codes” prohibited slaves from owning guns. After President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and after the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolishing slavery was adopted and the Civil War ended in 1865, States persisted in prohibiting blacks, now freemen, from owning guns under laws renamed “Black Codes.” They did so on the basis that blacks were not citizens, and thus did not have the same rights, including the right to keep and bear arms protected in the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, as whites. This view was specifically articulated by the U.S. Supreme Court in its infamous 1857 decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford to uphold slavery.

The United States Congress overrode most portions of the Black Codes by passing the Civil Rights Act of 1866. The legislative histories of both the Civil Rights Act and the Fourteenth Amendment, as well as The Special Report of the Anti-Slavery Conference of 1867, are replete with denunciations of those particular statutes that denied blacks equal access to firearms. [Kates, Handgun Prohibition and the Original Meaning of the Second Amendment, 82 Mich. L. Rev. 204, 256 (1983)] However, facially neutral disarming through economic means laws remain in effect.

For more…

 

 

Photo courtesy Oleg Volk / www.a-human-right.com